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HomeGambia NewsGAMBIA: OUSAINOU AND AMIE BOJANG'S TAXI RIDE: THE DRIVER'S STATEMENT

GAMBIA: OUSAINOU AND AMIE BOJANG’S TAXI RIDE: THE DRIVER’S STATEMENT

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According to Abdoulie Drammeh’s testimony, the two defendants, Ousainou Bojang (1st accused) and Amie Bojang (2nd accused), were taken from Brufut to Darsilameh by the Brikama Nema taxi driver.

Two officers from the Police Intervention Unit (PIU) were murdered by Ousainou Bojang, who is also facing six charges overall. Amie Bojang, his older sister, is accused of being an accessory after the fact of murder.

According to Mr. Drammeh’s testimony, he identified Ousainou and Amie Bojang while they were in court.

He narrated how Amie Bojang had agreed to pay D1,300 for a ride from Brikama to Brufut. Amie requested that he wait upon their arrival in Brufut. Mr. Drammeh was waiting to be picked up by Ousainou Bojang, according to his sister, who he accompanied into the taxi shortly after. After that, Amie came along, and the three of them set out towards Brikama.

The siblings spoke Jola while on the road. When they got to Brikama, Amie that they head to the garage; however, Ousainou turned him down, citing a police officer’s warning to stay away from public areas. Mandinka and Wolof were the languages spoken during this discussion.

For an extra D1,200, Amie had Mr. Drammeh take them to Darsilameh. They went to a bike shop in Darsilameh to get their bikes fixed. Ousainou was escorted by a biker that Amie had contacted.

Ousainou Bojang informed me that his sister had told him that I was going to come get him when I asked him what had happened. Ami Bojang, his sister, emerged from hiding when he arrived a minute later, and we were off. We travelled to Brikama in great detail. They were speaking Jola when we were on our way. Ami Bojang, the sister, informed Ousainou Bojang, the boyfriend, “Let’s go to the garage” when we got in Brikama as arranged. Usainou Bojang, the male, subsequently told her no, and the police officer who had counselled him warned him against going somewhere public. Both in Wolof and Mandinka, he said that, but not in Jola.

We settled on a price of D1,200 when the sister (Amie Bojang) instructed me to bring them to Darsilameh. After that, we set out towards Darsilameh. When we got there, we paused at a bicycle repair shop. Afterwards, Ami Bojang, my sister, got out of the car and arrived, as she had promised. The sister went over to the left side of the road to speak with a motorcyclist who was standing there. According to Mr. Drammeh’s testimony, after speaking with the biker, she returned to Ousainou Bojang and informed him that she had already agreed with the motorcyclist and that they should go.

After the motorcyclist took Ousainou Bojang to Brikama, Mr. Drammeh told the court that he and the second accused, Amie Bojang, went back to Brikama.

He said that when they got to Brikama, which was between the church and the police station, they saw a car with seven people inside. in his way to work, he told Amie Bojang to get in that car.

Mr. Drammeh stated that he couldn’t remember the precise date, but he thought it was about eight months ago.

During the course of his cross-examination, Mr. Drammeh informed the court that he had spoken with law enforcement about the matter.

Counsel Lamin J. Darboe, who was representing Ousainou Bojang, inquired as to whether Mr. Drammeh could recall the police statement he had provided.

The court was informed by Mr. Drammeh that he had thumbprinted the statement and inserted his contact number in the paper. He confirmed this to the court.

Following this, Counsel LJ Darboe brought a photocopy of the statement to Mr. Drammeh’s attention, and he duly identified it as the one he had previously provided to the authorities.

Next, LJ Darboe, who was representing Mr. Drammeh, went to A.M. Yusuf, the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP), to ask for a hard copy of Mr. Drammeh’s statement.

Counsel LJ Darboe requested to offer the original copy as exhibits upon receiving it from the DPP.

The original copy of the witness statement was requested from the DPP.

The prosecutor duly complied and turned over the statement to the defence attorney.

Subsequently, the defence attorney moved to have the witness’s statement tendered into evidence.

The prosecution’s decision to admit the witness’s statement was unopposed by the DPP. It was then admitted into evidence by Hon. Justice Jaiteh, who designated it as Defence exhibit D8.

“According to what you were told by the second accused, Amy Bojang, while you were negotiating with her, she was planning to select someone from Brufut?” Legal advisor LJ Darboe inquired.

“Indeed, that is exactly what she informed me,” Mr. Drammeh stated in his court testimony.

“Is it not true that Boussou Bojang, the first accused, was mentioning a white lady on the way to Brikama?” Legal advisor LJ Darboe inquired.

According to Mr. Drammeh, “I didn’t know what they were saying” when it came to the Jola language, when Ousainou and Amie Bojang were speaking.

Next, LJ Darboe, the counsel, took up exhibit D8, which was Abdoulie Drammeh’s statement as a witness, and inquired as to his literacy level.

In court, Mr. Drammeh stated his inability to read and write.

After that, Counsel LJ Darboe wanted to know if the police had read his statement to him; Mr. Drammeh affirmed to the court that this had happened.

I would want to read the first two sentences of the witness statement, if it is okay with you, my lord. The court is indulged by counsel LJ Darboe.

After that, the court gave him permission to read Mr. Drammeh’s opening remarks.

It was difficult for me to understand what they were saying in Jola, but I overheard them mention a “toubab,” a white lady, when we were in the car. Did it happen like that? Mr. Drammeh’s statement was read by Counsel LJ Darboe.

What transpired was as follows, Mr. Drammeh informed the court.

Counsel Sillah was asked about the accused’s clothing hues by the lawyer defending Amie Bojang, the second accused.

The colours of their clothing eluded Mr. Drammeh, he told the court.

To continue on June 3, 2024, the lawsuit was postponed.

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